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Youth Turnout About 20%, Comparable to Recent Midterm Years

Jonathan M. Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service, Medford, MA – An estimated 20.4 percent of young Americans under the age of 30 voted in Tuesday’s midterm elections, compared to 23.5 percent in the last midterm election (2006). The change in the turnout rate is outside the margin of error (+/-2%), according to Tufts University’s Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE), the nation’s premier research organization on the civic and political engagement of young Americans. Almost nine million Americans between the ages of 18 and 29 voted. Almost 10 million people in the same age group voted in 2006.

The estimated turnout the day after elections is based on exit polls along with the number of ballots counted and demographic data from the US Census. When voting data from the US Census (its Current Population Survey, November 2010 Voting Supplement) become available next year, it will be possible to see with greater certainty whether turnout rose, fell, or stayed the same. It is already clear, however, that turnout was in the typical range for a midterm election.

Youth turnout rose in states where the Vote Again 2010 coalition is highly active. (Vote Again 2010 is a coalition of more than 30 501(c)3 nonpartisan youth-serving organizations and media partners that work to increase youth turnout.) In these states, youth turnout rose by six points compared to 1998, whereas it fell in the seven states where the Vote Again 2010 Coalition organizations were least active.  One explanation for the higher rates of participation in the Vote Again 2010 states is that there was more voter outreach to young voters and political advertising in these states. Current research shows that youth participate when they are asked to do so. As shown in Table 2, turnout increased between 1998 and 2010 in states that had high levels of youth outreach, but not in states where the Coalition was least active. Many of the groups that make up the Vote Again 2010 Coalition formed after the 1998 midterm elections, when the youth turnout hit its lowest rate.

For more detail and statistics on youth voting in 2010, please see our 2010 Election Press Release.

21 Responses to “Youth Turnout About 20%, Comparable to Recent Midterm Years”

  1. The Tens: 10 Most Talked About Events Of The Midterm Election | The Well Versed Says:

    [...] 10% of blacks voting and 8% of Hispanics and Latinos voting nationwide. However, data from CIRCLE (Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement) projected that youth turnout [...]

  2. Young voters respond to outreach « Vote Again 2010 Says:

    [...] the Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE) released its first numbers on young voters and their participation in yesterday’s midterm elections. While CIRCLE found that young voter [...]

  3. Midterm Elections Post-Mortem Says:

    [...] youth are still engaged, involved and interested. The old idea of youth apathy dies hard but it was reported that voter turnout of people under 30 was comparable to the 2006 midterm election numbers, and that [...]

  4. Proof That Obama Has Lost His Coalition In Just 2 Years Says:

    [...] enter politics in our nations history as evaporated in just 2 years…we now have documented proof : Jonathan M. Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service, Medford, MA – An estimated 20.4 [...]

  5. » More Election Comments From Facebook & Twitter Liberal Values Says:

    [...] Youth turn out only around 20 percent. Come on guys, it is your future which is at stake. [...]

  6. Who Has the Best Democracy? « VOA Student Union Says:

    [...] data. In 2008, about 62% of Americans that are able to vote did exercise their right. This year, about 20% of Americans under the age of 30 turned out to vote, according to the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement.  That’s [...]

  7. Andy Bernstein: No One Hit the Mark With Young Voters | BlackNewsTribune.com Says:

    [...] a little, from 23.5 percent in the last midterm elections to 20.4 percent last night., according to CIRCLE. The percentage of the overall electorate that was under 30 also trended down slightly, from 12 [...]

  8. Andy Bernstein: No One Hit the Mark With Young Voters | KING.NET Says:

    [...] a little, from 23.5 percent in the last midterm elections to 20.4 percent last night., according to CIRCLE. The percentage of the overall electorate that was under 30 also trended down slightly, from 12 [...]

  9. Andy Bernstein: No One Hit the Mark With Young Voters Says:

    [...] a little, from 23.5 percent in the last midterm elections to 20.4 percent last night., according to CIRCLE. The percentage of the overall electorate that was under 30 also trended down slightly, from 12 [...]

  10. Death of Democracy? The Youth Vote and the Election of 2012 by William John Cox « Dandelion Salad Says:

    [...] estimated 20.4% of young people voted on November 2, which is about a million fewer than in 2006 and was less than half of those who [...]

  11. Can Dems Reenergize the Youth Vote? – A Ministry of GBOD Says:

    [...] estimated 20.4 percent of young people voted on Nov. 2, which is about a million fewer than in 2006 and was less than half of those who voted in [...]

  12. Politics & the Media Says:

    [...] of young voters that went to the polls staggered to about 20% this midterm election, according to The Center For Information & Research On Civic Learning And Engagement.  As expected in a midterm election, the young voter turnout is significantly lower than the [...]

  13. The Youth Vote — Where Has It Gone? | Inelation's Blog Says:

    [...] Sources This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. ← Today’s Sudoku… Seeking Health in US is One Lame Experience → LikeBe the first to like this post. [...]

  14. Council Passes Student Voting Resolution | AS Express Says:

    [...] every student should be concerned about the policies of our federal government. Even so, only about 20 percent of Americans under the age of 30 voted in the last [...]

  15. Why You Should GYT (Get Yourself Tested) Says:

    [...] adults will get an STD than a college degree, and almost three times as many will get an STD than voted in the last election. More Americans will have an STD, by the time they are 25, than will be diagnosed with cancer, [...]

  16. How Well Did We “Get Out Her Vote?” Says:

    [...] and current research shows that youth participate when they are asked to do so. Even though the youth voter turnout decreased from the last midterm election, we still proved that our voting block should definitely not be [...]

  17. Youth turnout falls in Nov. 2 election | El Estoque Online Says:

    [...] this year’s youth turnout is comparable to that of previous midterm elections. CIRCLE reported that 23 percent of eligible youths voted in the 2006 midterms, and 20 [...]

  18. Youth turnout falls in Nov. 2 election | El Estoque Says:

    [...] this year’s youth turnout is comparable to that of previous midterm elections. CIRCLE reported that 23 percent of eligible youths voted in the 2006 midterms, and 20 [...]

  19. The Tyranny of Opinion Polls @ The Most Revolutionary Act Says:

    [...] only 7% of landline respondents were under 30  (20% of the 2010 midterm vote came from Americans under 30 – see http://www.civicyouth.org/youth-turnout-about-20-comparable-to-recent-midterm-years/). [...]

  20. The Tyranny of Opinion Polls Says:

    [...] only 7% of landline respondents were under 30  (20% of the 2010 midterm vote came from Americans under 30 – see http://www.civicyouth.org/youth-turnout-about-20-comparable-to-recent-midterm-years/). [...]

  21. daily news Says:

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