CIRCLE (The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement)
conducts research on the civic and political engagement of young Americans.
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The Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning and Engagement

CIRCLE in the news

Here is a roundup of some recent news articles citing CIRCLE:

In an article about voter ID requirements, CIRCLE’s Abby Kiesa says, “‘There’s a huge gap in the research right now’ concerning how many college students lack the proper identification to register to vote … But, she wrote in an e-mail, ‘regardless of the effects of voter-ID laws on turnout, we think that more youth participating is better, and putting obstacles in the way of this is unconscionable.’” (Molly Redden, “As 2012 Elections Loom, Partisans on Both Sides Argue the Effect of Voter-ID Laws on Students,” Chronicle of Higher Education, 7/11)

Emily Schultheis writes in Politico, “Engagement with other users is one of the main ways candidates can distinguish themselves on Twitter, experts say. ‘Certainly, what you’d be aiming for if you’re a politician … is not that [voters] are just following you but reprocessing your material,’ said Peter Levine, director of the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement at Tufts University” (“New Gingrich Miles Ahead in Twitter Primary,” 7/12).

Katie Banks (Medill News Service) covers campaigns by young politicians and cites CIRCLE data on youth turnout: “Tomorrow’s Leaders Here Today: Young Adults Making Waves by Challenging Older Incumbents,” Austin Weekly News, 6/29

CIRCLE’s Peter Levine tells The Hill newspaper, “the GOP primary might not be too helpful to the Republican Party, as primaries typically draw low youth turnout. ‘To the extent that the primaries are dominated by strong conservative candidates and issues, the Republicans will tend to alienate independent young voters who are following the news,’ Levine wrote in an email. ‘It will be hard to recover with them in the general election.’ …

“Levine agreed that in 2008, college voters were particularly important because they overwhelmingly favored Obama. Yet this year, Levine wrote, the magnitude of their impact ‘depends on whether the president is able to mobilize his “base” again, and also whether Republicans are able to make some inroads with young voters. In 2008, Republicans performed extraordinarily badly with the college vote, but they have plenty of room to improve.’

“Much of college students’ roles in the 2012 election will depend on the Republican nominee, Levine said.

“Since 2004, young people have become heavily Democratic,” he wrote. “The question now is whether they will be a lasting part of the Democratic coalition, or whether the Republicans will put them back into play somehow.” (Becki Steinberg, “College 2012, “ The Hill, 7/11)

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