CIRCLE (The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement)
conducts research on the civic and political engagement of young Americans.
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The Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning and Engagement

CIRCLE’s MISSION

CIRCLE (The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement) conducts research on civic education in schools, colleges, and community settings and on young Americans’ voting and political participation, service, activism, media use, and other forms of civic engagement. It is based at the Jonathan M. Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service at Tufts University.

Established in 2001 based on a recommendation of the National Commission on Civic Renewal, CIRCLE quickly earned its reputation for reliable, independent, timely research. CIRCLE’s research is widely cited in scholarly publications and most national news media ranging from The New York Times to CNN. CIRCLE’s special publications, such as The Civic Mission of Schools report (jointly published with Carnegie Corporation of New York, 2003), Higher Education: Civic Mission & Civic Effects (jointly published with The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching in 2006), and Peter Levine’s book The Future of Democracy (2007) have changed the public discourse on how citizens, particularly young people, engage in civic and political life, and the kinds of programs and activities in schools and colleges that foster student civic learning and engagement in democracy.

A national leader in civic education and research, Tisch College is setting a standard for higher education’s role in civic engagement. Engaging students and faculty from all Tufts schools, Tisch College supports a wide range of interdisciplinary, community-based research and generates an enduring culture of active citizenship across the university.

Citizens Want A Bigger Role from Jeffrey Abelson on Vimeo.

CIRCLE’s Accomplishments

CIRCLE has built the research field.

CIRCLE has a reputation for reliable, independent, timely research. Harvard University Professor Robert Putnam has said of CIRCLE: “You’ve brought the best and most serious research to one place. You’ve applied an expert screen on the research. It’s a crucial contribution to the field. It’s a model for policy relevant and academic debates. [It’s] useful to have someone studying the issue who’s outside the debate and can be a reliable source for information.” CIRCLE’s research is widely cited in scholarly publications. Google Scholar™ (a search engine restricted to scholarly publications) finds 41,800 publications that cite CIRCLE by its full name. CIRCLE’s special publications, such as The Civic Mission of Schools report (jointly published with Carnegie Corporation of New York, 2003), Higher Education: Civic Mission & Civic Effects (jointly published with The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching in 2006), and Peter Levine’s book The Future of Democracy (2007) provide literature reviews and summaries.

CIRCLE has begun to change public discourse and press coverage about young people as citizens

CIRCLE is doing this by providing a stream of reliable data and analysis that helps Americans to understand the strengths and weaknesses of civic education, broadly defined. Our research has been cited in most national newspapers, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Los Angeles Times, and on CNN, NPR, PBS, MTV, and Fox News. In the months between July 2008 and the 2008 presidential election, CIRCLE was cited in 1,253 newspaper, magazine, broadcast, or web stories, including 829 print media articles.

CIRCLE has changed political campaigns in American by helping to show that it is cost-effective to mobilize people between the ages of 18 and 30.

Although one major focus of our work is schooling, we recognize that young people are also educated for citizenship in other venues. Specifically, when young adults are contacted by political campaigns, they gain political knowledge and interest and become more likely to participate in other ways, such as volunteering. However, most politicians and campaigns dropped young people from their target lists during the 1980s and 1990s. In response, CIRCLE has supported, organized, and analyzed experiments designed to test the effectiveness of various forms of campaigning when directed at young voters. The main lesson of these experiments is that it is cost-effective for both major parties to canvass young people. We believe that this research helped to influence the Democrats and Republicans to target youth in 2004 and 2008 so far, contributing to the eleven percentage-point rise in youth turnout in 2004 over 2000 and dramatic turnout in the 2008 primaries and caucuses. (A senior official on one national presidential campaign wrote after the 2004 election: “I literally would have been lost without CIRCLE on the campaign!!! You would laugh if you read any of my briefing memos or talking points—they are littered with CIRCLE research.”)

CIRCLE has provided training and technical assistance to many organizations, mostly direct providers of services to youth.

Since 2008, CIRCLE has answered research queries, provided tailored data to meet specific needs, attended meetings, reviewed materials and strategic plans, and/or served on advisory or governing boards of 240 separate organizations, including 40 institutions of higher education and 15 foundations. Rev. Lennox Yearwood, Jr. President of the Hip Hop Caucus, writes, “CIRCLE is a critical resource for groups like the Hip Hop Caucus and others who are trying to engage young people in the political process. Research directs our strategy for our work in the community, and the team at CIRCLE is always willing to provide us with the data and analysis that we need in order to have real impact and to reach the young people who are the least civically engaged.”

Commission on Youth Voting and Civic Knowledge

Wednesday, May 16th, 2007

Commission on Youth Voting and Civic Knowledge

What is the Commission? | What is the Report | How to Use this Report | Sharing This Report | Why this Commission Now? | What Did the Commission Focus On | Who is on the Commission?

What is the Commission

CIRCLE formed a distinguished, nonpartisan, scholarly commission that investigated rigorous data on young Americans’ civic knowledge and voting, and then issued recommendations for how to improve both. The commission was formed in response to controversies about recent voting laws (for instance, the new state photo ID laws) as well as debates about civic education in schools and colleges. It, however, took a broader view, considering a wide range of potential influences on political knowledge and engagement. The commission began with no position on the existing or proposed policies; its deliberations were heavily influenced by new data collected during and immediately after the 2012 election.

What is the Report

After interviewing stakeholders, and surveying thousands of young people and hundreds of teachers, the Commission on Youth Voting and Civic Knowledge released its report All Together Now: Collaboration and Innovation for Youth Engagement” (October 2013).

The result is a detailed yet wide-ranging look at the current state of civic education, informed voting, and political engagement of the nation’s youth. The report highlights some of the Commission’s previously released findings, presents brand-new findings that further shed light on these issues, and makes a compelling case that strengthening youth participation will require concerted efforts from every corner of our society.

How to Use the Report

To go along with the report, CIRCLE will be providing materials to help stakeholders reflect on and use the information therein. As “All Together Now” proposes, a wide range of people and groups must come together to have a significant effect on youth voting and civic knowledge. These people and groups work in schools, election offices, civic learning coalitions, community-based organizations, statehouses, and other places. We’ve created resources to use within and across these settings.

«  How Civic Leaders Can Use the Report

«  How Education Associations Can Use the Report

«  Individual Reflection Guide for Teachers

«  Moderator’s Guide for Holding a Discussion Among Teachers (forthcoming)

«  Moderator’s Guide for Gathering Youth Engagement Advocates (forthcoming)

To learn about additional materials,  get involved in strategy conversations, and network with others working to further youth engagement, fill out this form.

Sharing the Report

Graphics | Sample Tweets | Sample Facebook Posts | Sample Announcement

Grassroots Advocates Graphic Civics Teachers Graphic

Sample Tweets

Today @Civicyouth released “All Together Now: Collaboration & Innovation for Youth Engagement” w/data-driven recs http://bit.ly/19xF62j

Inequality of civic opportunities among youth major challenge to participation, says @Civicyouth in major report: http://bit.ly/19xF62j

Govt #Shutdown an example of what makes #CivicEd challenging. Also opportunity to teach new generation to be civil http://bit.ly/19xF62j

New @Civicyouth report says to significantly increase youth political engagement will need many to collaborate http://bit.ly/19xF62j

Sample Facebook Posts

“Every generation needs civic education. Yong people do not automatically acquire the skills, knowledge, motivations and values necessary to contribute to the republic; they must be educated and encouraged” – CIRCLE’s Commission on Youth Voting & Civic Knowledge http://www.civicyouth.org/?p=5915

Should states mandate courses and tests for civics? See what the CIRCLE’s Commission on Youth Voting and Civic Knowledge has learned in this new groundbreaking report. http://www.civicyouth.org/?p=5915

Sample Announcement

“All Together Now: Collaboration and Innovation for Youth Engagement” is a new, data-driven report from CIRCLE (Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning & Engagement), whose scholarly research informs policy and practice for healthier youth development and a better democracy. The report is the final product of the distinguished and scholarly Commission on Youth Voting and Civic Knowledge, which CIRCLE brought together to take a broad view and consider a wide range of potential influences on political knowledge and engagement. The result is a detailed yet wide-ranging look at the current state of civic education, informed voting, and political engagement of the nation’s youth. The report makes a compelling case that strengthening youth participation will require concerted efforts from every corner of our society.

Why this Commission? Why Now?

Youth political engagement requires attention. Forty-five percent of young people age 18-29 voted in 2012, down from 51% in 2008. The roughly half of young Americans who do not vote are consistently poorer and less educated than their peers who do vote.

In addition, states differ dramatically in youth turnout, with some frequently seeing twice the voting rates of others. States affect their own young citizens’ political engagement with a wide range of voting laws and by enacting policies for civic education in public schools. Along with the states, the federal government, local governments, and major institutions such as universities make decisions that affect young people’s knowledge and attitudes related to politics and their voting.

What Did the Commission Focus On?

To investigate the full range of influences on informed youth voting, CIRCLE organized and staffed a scholarly, nonpartisan commission. The commission was funded by the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the W.T. Grant Foundation, the Robert R. McCormick Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, and the Youth Engagement Fund. To inform the Commission’s deliberations, CIRCLE conducted the following major, original research:

  • CIRCLE conducted a nationally representative online survey of 1,695 youth (ages 18-29) in June/July 2012 and 1,109 of the same youth between in October 2012.
  • Immediately after the election, CIRCLE surveyed 4,483 individuals (ages 18-24) by cell phone and land-line phones. At least 75 participants came from each of the 50 states and Washington DC (75-131 per state) to allow us to estimate the effects of state policies using a statistical model.  Participants of Black and Hispanic backgrounds were slightly oversampled.
  • In May and June 2013, CIRCLE surveyed a national sample of high school government and social studies teachers. We collected 720 complete teacher responses.
  • CIRCLE interviewed 15 stakeholders (nonprofit leaders and advocates, including young adults) and coded and summarized their ideas.
  • CIRCLE analyzed National Exit Poll and the Census November Current Population Supplement data to calculate youth turnout and to examine relationships between turnout and laws at the state level.
  • CIRCLE conducted a full scan of all the states’ civic education policies and a separate scan of their teacher certification requirements.

Who Served on the Commission?

The members of the Commission are among the most distinguished scholarly experts on civic engagement and related topics, representing diverse disciplines and institutions. In alphabetical order, the commissioners were:

  • Lisa García Bedolla, Associate Professor of Language and Literacy, Society and Culture, University of California Berkeley School of Education
  • David Campbell, Professor of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame and director of the Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy
  • Constance Flanagan, Professor, Department of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Trey Grayson, Director of the Institute of Politics at Harvard and former Secretary of State of Kentucky
  • Eitan Hersh, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Yale University
  • Diana Hess, Senior Vice President, the Spencer Foundation, and Professor of Education, University of Wisconsin.
  • Joseph Kahne, Professor of Education at Mills College and Chair of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics
  • Alex Keyssar, Matthew W. Stirling Jr. Professor of History and Social Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School
  • Michael McDevitt, Professor of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Colorado at Boulder
  • Richard G. Niemi, Don Alonzo Watson Professor of Political Science, University of Rochester
  • Eric Plutzer, Professor of Political Science, Penn State University
  • Debra Satz, Marta Sutton Weeks Professor of Ethics in Society, and Professor of Philosophy, Stanford University
  • Ismail K. White, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Ohio State University

Advisory Board

Wednesday, May 16th, 2007

The work of CIRCLE is guided by an Advisory Board, comprised of some of the nation’s leading experts, researchers, and practitioners in the field of youth civic engagement.

Biko Baker, The League of Young Voters
Michael X Delli Carpini, Annenberg School, University of Pennsylvania (chair)
Tom Ehrlich, The Stanford School of Education
Maya Enista, Mobilize.org
Constance Flanagan, University of Wisconsin
Bill Galston, Brookings Institution
Shawn Ginwright, University of California San Francisco
Diana Hess, Spencer Foundation
Deb Jospin, sagawa/jospin consulting firm (ex officio, as chair of Tisch Board of Advocates)
Joseph Kahne, Mills College
Richard M. Lerner, Tufts University
Meira Levinson, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Susan Ostrander, Tufts University
Kent Portney, Tufts University
Carmen Sirianni, Brandeis University
Dorothy Stoneman, YouthBuild USA
Lauren Young, LJYoung Consulting

Contact Staff

Wednesday, May 16th, 2007

Main Office Information

Fax: 617-627-3401

For questions or requests email CIRCLE Youth Coordinator & Researcher Abby Kiesa (abby.kiesa@tufts.edu).

CIRCLE
Jonathan M. Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service
Lincoln Filene Hall
Tufts University
Medford, MA 02155

Staff

(click for staff biography and contact information)

Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg, Deputy Director
Abby Kiesa, Youth Coordinator & Researcher
Peter Levine, Director
Kathy O.Connor, Administrative Coordinator
Felicia M. Sullivan, Senior Researcher
Nancy Thomas, Director of CIRCLE’s Initiative for the Study of Higher Education and Public Life

Staff Biographies

Dr. Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg

Deputy Director, CIRCLE
Email: Kei.Kawashima_Ginsberg@Tufts.edu
Phone: (617) 627-2529

Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg is the Deputy Director of CIRCLE.  Kei oversees CIRCLE’s core research projects and produces resources and reports for various audiences, including peer-reviewed articles, reports, and fact sheets.  With a background in positive youth development and interest in diverse and marginalized youth, Kei is especially interested in providing organizations and communities with research that would help increase civic and political engagement opportunities for diverse groups of youth.  Kei also works with practitioners by providing consultation to staff at Tisch College and community partners about community-university collaboration and community-based research.  Kei earned her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Loyola University Chicago and has extensive experience in working with youth of diverse backgrounds both as a researcher and practitioner.

Abby Kiesa
Youth Coordinator & Researcher
Email: Abby.Kiesa@Tufts.edu

As Youth Coordinator & Researcher at CIRCLE, Abby serves as liaison to practitioner organizations across the country.  She communicates research findings and tracks recommendations from young people, youth-serving organizations, and educators for future research. Abby also works on CIRCLE’s qualitative research and selected evaluation projects. She has worked extensively on CIRCLE’s ongoing research focused on young people who do not have college experience. Through this project and others she has moderated many focus groups and interviews.  Before coming to CIRCLE, Abby organized students around the country as part of a national campaign of Campus Compact to increase youth involvement in public life. She has contributed to several publications and co-edited ‘Raise Your Voice: A Student Guide to Making Positive Social Change’. In 2007 Abby was named an Emerging Leader in Service-Learning, “a two-year intensive experience designed to elevate and prepare a new, culturally diverse generation of service-learning leaders committed to working with traditionally under-served populations, schools, and communities.” In addition to working at CIRCLE, she is a graduate student in American Studies at the University of Maryland College Park.

Abby currently serves on the Board of Directors of IARSLCE (the International Association for Research on Service-Learning and Community Engagement), the American Democracy Project Implementation Committee (a project of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities), and is on the Leadership Team of the Generational Alliance.

Peter Levine
Director, CIRCLE
Associate Dean for Research, Tisch College
Phone: (617) 627-2302
Website (with blog and publications): www.peterlevine.ws
Email: Peter.Levine@Tufts.edu

Peter Levine became Director of CIRCLE in January 2006, succeeding Bill Galston. He is also the Lincoln Filene Professor of Citizenship & Public Affairs in Tufts University’s Jonathan Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service. Outside of Tufts, he is involved with:

  • The Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools (steering committee member, former chair)
  • The Charles Kettering Foundation (director)
  • Deliberative Democracy Consortium (steering committee member)
  • Everyday Democracy (as board member of the J. Paul Aicher Foundation, which oversees it)
  • Street lLaw, Inc. (member of the Board of Directors and Program Committee chair)
  • AmericaSpeaks (board member)
  • Discovering Justice
  • Current advisory board service: America’s Promise Research Council; Mobilize.org Advisory Board; eJournal of Public Affairs (since 2011); MTV’s Democracy Class; Generation Citizen; Fair Vote Research Advisory Committee; The Democracy Imperative; Cambridge University’s Forum for Youth Participation & Democracy International Advisory Group; Center for Engaged Democracy, Merrimack College; Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement Action Network Steering Committee; Council of the American Commonwealth Partnership; Youth Service America Academic Council ; California Civic Engagement Project; Campus Election Engagement Project.

Levine’s books are:

Levine updates his blog every weekday.

Kathy O’Connor
Administrative Coordinator
E-mail: Kathy.OConnor@tufts.edu
Phone:  617-627-4710

Kathy O’Connor joined CIRCLE in August of 2010. As the Administrative Coordinator she handles the organization and processing of daily events and various projects. She provides support to staff, processes financial paperwork, arranges travel and helps in the preparation of events throughout the year. Kathy’s background includes Administrative duties in various companies. She was active in volunteering with the youth in her community and before joining CIRCLE she was employed by and involved in her local YMCA’s afterschool program.

Felicia M. Sullivan, Ph.D.
Senior Researcher
Felicia.Sullivan@tufts.edu

617-627-3077

Felicia Sullivan joined CIRCLE as Senior Researcher in the summer of 2012. Felicia works on a range of analytical projects and co-produces reports for various audiences. Felicia is particularly interested in supporting groups and organizations that seek to create new environments that enliven and support civic participation and political empowerment. Felicia has a doctorate in public policy from the University of Massachusetts Boston and holds Master degrees in media studies and public policy. Her current research looks at out-of-school time program design and teen political engagement attitudes. Prior to CIRCLE, Felicia worked for nearly 20 years in a range of community-based settings as a media advocate, educator, consultant and researcher supporting diverse individuals in multi-ethnic urban settings. She is also adjunct faculty at University of Massachusetts Boston, teaching graduate and undergraduate students in the College of Public and Community Service, the College of Education and Human Development and the College of Liberal Arts. The use of communications and media in community-building, political engagement, and personal change are her areas of particular expertise.

Nancy Thomas
Director, CIRCLE’s Initiative for the Study of Higher Education and Public Life
Nancy.Thomas@tufts.edu

Nancy Thomas directs CIRCLE’s Initiative for the Study of Higher Education and Public Life and Campus Counts, a national study of college student voting rates and patterns. She joins CIRCLE after five years as director of the Democracy Imperative, a national network of academics and civic leaders working to strengthen democracy in and through higher education. She is also a senior associate with Everyday Democracy and serves on boards for the American Commonwealth Partnership, the Campaign for Stronger Democracy, and others. Her interests are in deliberative democracy in public life, student civic learning and political engagement, and free speech, civil discourse and academic freedom on campus. She has published many chapters and articles on educating for democracy. She holds a doctorate in administration, planning, and social policy from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a JD from Case Western Reserve University.

Expert Guide

Wednesday, May 16th, 2007

This guide contains contact information for experts on youth civic engagement.

CIRCLE Staff Bios

Peter Levine, Director of CIRCLE

Already this presidential election cycle, Levine has been quoted in numerous national, top-tier publications and is viewed as an expert by political press covering the 2012 presidential campaign. Levine has authored several op-eds on the engagement of young voters this election cycle that has received significant attention, including at Politico and Fox News. Levine has been quoted in many major media outlets including the Washington Post, USA Today, NY Times, San Francisco Chronicle, and the Christian Science Monitor. He has appeared on MSNBC, NPR, CNN, and others.

Levine graduated from Yale in 1989 with a degree in philosophy and continued to study philosophy at Oxford on a Rhodes Scholarship, receiving his doctorate in 1992. Levine is the author of six books including We are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For: The Philosophy and Practice of Civic Renewal, which will be published by Oxford University Press in 2012, and The Future of Democracy: Developing the Next Generation of American Citizens (2007). He has been a board member or trustee of the Newspaper Association of America, the American Bar Association’s Division of Public Education, Street Law, Inc., the Charles Kettering Foundation, Everyday Democracy, AmericaSPEAKS, and other organizations devoted to nonpartisan civic renewal.

Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg

Kei is CIRCLE’s Lead Researcher and spearheads its advanced statistical analysis. Kei has recently been quoted in McClatchy, the Miami Herald and CBS News. Kei earned her doctorate degree in 2008 from Loyola University Chicago in Clinical Psychology and has extensive experience in working with youth of diverse backgrounds both as a researcher and a practitioner.

Abby Kiesa

Abby has recently been quoted in: ABC News, SF Chronicle, The American Independent, and the Chronicle of Higher Education. As Youth Coordinator & Researcher at CIRCLE, Abby serves as liaison to practitioner organizations across the country.  She communicates research findings and tracks recommendations from young people, youth-serving organizations, and educators for future research. Abby also works on CIRCLE’s qualitative research and selected evaluation projects. Previous to CIRCLE, Abby organized students around the country and has contributed to several publications and co-edited ‘Raise Your Voice: A Student Guide to Making Positive Social Change’.

Surbhi Godsay

Surbhi conducts quantitative analyses and co-produces reports for various public audiences. Surbhi is interested in providing research to increase civic and political engagement among disengaged youths, ethnic minority and immigrant populations. Surbhi has recently been quoted in the National Journal and Washington Times.

Felicia Sullivan

Felicia worked for nearly 20 years in a range of community-based settings as a media advocate, educator, consultant and researcher supporting diverse individuals in multi-ethnic urban settings. She has been quoted in and written for several publications on community media and technology.

Additionally, these experts are current and past members of CIRCLE’s Advisory Board.   Feel free to contact them directly or by calling CIRCLE at 617-627-4781.

Political Participation and Voting


Ivan Frishberg

Political Director,
Environment America
(202) 683-1250

Fredrick C. Harris
Professor,
Department of Political Science
Columbia University
7th Floor, IAB
420 West 118th Street
New York, NY 10027
212-854-6593
fh2170@columbia.edu

Jane Junn
Department of Political Science & Eagleton Institute of Politics
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
junn@rci.rutgers.edu
732-932-9384, x250

Ruth B. Mandel
Board of Governors
Professor of Politics
Director, Eagleton Institute of Politics
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ
732-932-9384, ext. 228
rmandel@rci.rutgers.edu

Kent Portney,
Professor,
Political Science Department,
Tufts University
(617) 627-5131
kent.portney@tufts.edu

Kay L. Schlozman
J. Joseph Moakley Professor,
Department of Political Science
Boston College
Chestnut Hill, MA
617-552-4174
kay.schlozman@bc.edu

John Transue
Assistant Professor of Political Science and Psychology: Social and Health Sciences
Duke University
Durham, NC
919-660-4336
transue@duke.edu

See also: Biko Baker, Lisa Garcia Bedolla, Scott Keeter

Community Participation

Maya Enista,
Chief Executive Officer,
Washington DC Office
1133 19th St NW, Floor 9
Washington, DC 20036
202.736.5703
maya@mobilize.org

Deb Jospin
sagawa/jospin consulting firm
(ex officio, as chair of Tisch Board of Advocates)
6 Primrose St.
Chevy Chase, MD 20815
301.718.1864
djospin@sagawajospin.com

Richard M. Lerner,
Bergstrom Chair,
Director of Institute for Applied Research in Youth Development
Eliot Pearson Department of Child Development
105 College Avenue
Tufts University,
Medford, MA 02155
(617) 627-5558
richard.lerner@tufts.edu

Susan Ostrander,
Professor,
Sociology Department,
Tufts University
617-627-2468
susan.ostrander@tufts.edu

Michael Sherraden
Benjamin E. Youngdahl Professor of Social Development
Washington University
St. Louis, MO
314-935-6691
sherrad@wustl.edu

Wendy Wheeler
President,
Innovation Center for Community and Youth Development
Takoma Park, MD
301- 270-1700 x 106
wwheeler@theinnovationcenter.org

See also: Barry Checkoway, Carmen Sirianni

Civic Knowledge

William A. Galston
Senior Fellow, Governance Studies
The Ezra K. Zilkha Chair in Governance Studies
Brookings Institution
202.797.6105
communications@brookings.edu

Scott Keeter
Director of Survey Research
Pew Research Center
Washington, DC
202-419-4362
skeeter@pewresearch.org

Judith Torney-Purta
Professor of Human Development,
College of Education
University of Maryland College Park, MD
301-405-2806
jtpurta@umd.edu

See also: Benjamin Barber

Youth Attitudes and Beliefs

Constance A. Flanagan
Professor, Department of Interdisciplinary Studies
University of Wisconsin-Madison
475 N. Charter St.
2418 Sterling Hall
Madison, WI 53706
(608) 263-2291
caflanagan@wisc.edu

See also: Scott Keeter, Judith Torney-Purta

News and Entertainment Media


Lance Bennett
Professor of Political Science, Ruddick C. Lawrence Professor of Communication
University of Washington
Seattle, WA
206-534-4946
lbennett@uw.edu

High School Civic Education

Rick Battistoni
Professor of Political Science, Director, Project 540 Providence
College Providence, RI
401-865-2787
rickbatt@providence.edu

Diana Hess,
Associate Professor
Curriculum & Instruction
University of Wisconsin
Teacher Education Rm: 256D
225 N. Mills Street
Madison, Wisconsin 53706
Phone: (608) 263-4571
Email: dhess@education.wisc.edu

Meira Levinson,
Assistant Professor of Education
Harvard Graduate School of Education
meira_levinson@gse.harvard.edu
617-496-1562

Lauren Young
Consultant
LJYoung Consulting
laurenjonesyoung@gmail.com

See also: Terry Pickeral

Service Learning


Shelley H. Billig
Vice President
RMC Research Corporation
Denver, CO
303-825-3636

billig@rmcdenver.com

Joseph Kahne
Professor, Education
John and Martha Davidson Chair
Dean of the School of Education
Research Director of
Civic Engagement Research Group
Mills College
Oakland, CA
510-430-3275
jkahne@mills.edu

See also: Rick Battistoni,  Thomas Ehrlich, Elizabeth Hollander, Terry Pickeral

Higher Education


Thomas Ehrlich
Senior Scholar
Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching
Menlo Park, CA
650-566-5137
ehrlich@carnegiefoundation.org

Elizabeth Hollander
Tisch College Senior Fellow
Tufts University
617-627-4178
elizabeth.hollander@tufts.edu

See also: Rick Battistoni, Harry C. Boyte, Joseph Kane, Ruth B. Mandel

Non-college 18-25’s

Biko Baker,
Executive Director,
The League of Young Voters
310 Atlantic Avenue, 2nd Floor
Brooklyn, NY  11201
213.925.1545
robbikobaker@gmail.com

Barry Checkoway
Professor of Social Work and Urban Planning
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI
734-763-5960
barrych@umich.edu

Dorothy Stoneman,
Founder and President,
YouthBuild USA
58 Day Street
Somerville, MA 02144
phone 617-741-1212
jjohnson@youthbuild.org

See also: Jaime Ernesto Uzeta

Group Memberships and Social Networks


Carmen Sirianni
Morris Hillquit Professor of Labor and Social Thought,
Department of Sociology
Brandeis University
Waltham, MA
781-736-2652
sirianni@brandeis.edu

See also: Ivan Frishberg, Frederick C. Harris, Kay L. Schlozman, John Transue

Concepts of Citizenship


Benjamin R. Barber
CivWorld @ Demos
220 Fifth Avenue
Fifth Floor
New York, NY 10001
(212) 389-1416

Harry C. Boyte
Senior Fellow, Co-Director
Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs
Co-Director, Center for Democracy and Citizenship
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, MN
612-625-5509
boyte001@umn.edu

Terry Pickeral
President
Cascade Educational Consultants
t.pickeral@comcast.net
360-303-7480

See also: Lance Bennett, Shelley H. Billig

Race, Gender and Immigrant Status


Lisa Garcia Bedolla
Associate Professor, Political Science
School of Social Sciences
Associate Professor, Chicano/Latino Studies
School of Social Sciences
University of California, Irvine
Irvine, CA
(949) 824-9298
lgarciab@uci.edu

See also: Frederick C. Harris, Ruth B. Mandel, and Connie Flanagan